Incident Command System (ICS) Training Courses

All Hands provides training at all levels of the Incident Command System (ICS) in accordance with FEMA guidelines and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

Introduction to the Incident Command System I-100 (2 hours)

Suggested orientation to the ICS management concept for all entry level personnel who may be newly assigned to an event, working in a support role, technical specialists, or off-incident personnel.  This course consists of module 1 of the National Interagency Incident Management System training curriculum.

Basic Incident Command System I-200 (12 hours)

Students are introduced to the management principles associated with ICS, organization, facilities, resource terminology, and the common responsibilities associated with all responders.  This course includes modules 2-6 of the National Interagency Incident Management System curriculum

Intermediate Incident Command System I-300 (24 hours)

The basic concepts presented in I-200 are expanded and discussed in detail.  The single command organization is stressed and students will be exposed to resource management and the role and function of each ICS position, including air operations.  Through a series of small group exercises students will be provided examples of how the essential system principles and components are used in incident planning.  This course includes modules 7-11 of the National Interagency Incident Management System curriculum.

Prerequisite:  I-200

Advanced Incident Command System I-400 (22 hours)

This course emphasizes large scale organization and development for major incidents.  Roles and relationships of the primary staff are examined as are the planning, operational, logistical, and fiscal considerations related to successful management of large and complex incidents.  Students will be introduced to the concepts of area command and unified command, as well as the necessity for interagency coordination.  This course includes modules 12-15 of the National Interagency Incident Management System curriculum.

Prerequisites:  I-200, I-300

Multi-Agency Coordination I-401 (2 hours)

The complexities of multiple agency coordination are examined and students will become familiar with the roles of EOCs and MAC groups in the management of large or complex incidents.  This course is module 16 in the National Interagency Incident Management System curriculum and provides an overview only.

Situation Unit Leader S-346 (16 hours)

Subjects covered include the situation unit’s mission, functions, organizing, staffing, activation, operation, and mobilization.  Through lecture and a series of group and individual exercises students will understand the unit’s role and required interactions in collecting, analyzing, and processing of information necessary to prepare reports, displays, and services required by other elements of the incident management organization, including incident predictions.

Resources Unit Leader S-348 (16 hours)

Mission, organization, and operation of the resources unit are covered through lecture and small group exercises.  Emphasis is placed on identification, tracking, and accountability of incident resources.  Students will be given the opportunity to experiment with “T-cards” and a variety of other systems.

Facilities Unit Leader S-354 (8 hours)

The unit’s mission, function, staffing, operation, and demobilization are examined through lecture and small group exercises.  The unit’s role in facility procurement and layout, contract management, vendor liaison, responder morale and safety, and interaction with the trades and crafts are emphasized.

Supply Unit Leader S-356 (8 hours)

Through lecture and a series of small group exercises students will be exposed to the role and function of the supply unit.  Emphasis is placed on the unit’s interactions with the rest of the incident management organization and with a variety of off-incident organizations such as dispatch, vendors, and other government supply sources.  Supply processes and ordering systems from the student’s home agency will be used for class examples and exercises.

Communications Unit Leader S-358 (8 hours)

Organization and operation of the incident communications function, management of incident communication centers, development of the incident communications plan, and communications coordination with the “outside” world will be covered through lecture, quizzes, and individual exercises.  The need for technical expertise and the breadth of communications systems required by modern incident management will be emphasized.  This course is more technically oriented than most ICS courses but it is appropriate for students without a technical background in communications systems and equipment who do not intend to function as a communications unit leader but who would like a better understanding of the role and function of the communications unit.

Incident Commander S-400 (16 hours)

Incident planning, management, demobilization, and evaluation are discussed in a seminar setting emphasizing group discussion, exercises, and role playing.  Students will be encouraged to apply a wide range of advanced ICS tools, including unified command, as potential solutions to management problems presented and they will be expected to actively contribute to group discussions throughout the class.

Safety Officer S-404 (32 hours)

Provides the student with the skills, knowledge, and professional tools necessary to function as a type 2 Safety Officer.  Topics covered are designed to increase Safety Officer effectiveness in the incident environment and include hazard analysis techniques, development of effective mitigations and counter measures, development of appropriate briefings and safety messages, and operating within the incident management team environment.

Command & General Staff S-420 (36 hours)

Students will study Incident Management Team organization and operation at the type incident level through lecture, team exercises, and a type 3 incident simulation.  Students are assigned to an incident management team or the week, in a specific command or general staff position.  At course completion students are qualified to serve as a command or general staff member of a type Incident Management Team.  Career experience at the command level and in interagency operations is highly recommended.

Operations Section Chief S-430 (16 hours)

Primary duties and responsibilities of the operations section chief and subordinate units will be examined.  The role of the section chief in developing and implementing incident strategy and tactics will be reviewed, along with the management difficulties unique to the operations section chief position.  Students will understand the key interactions which must occur between the section chief, subordinates, other members of the command and general staff, off incident organizations, and the host agency for successful incident management.  Students will determine section staffing and organization requirements, and learn to apply both strategy and tactics to achieve incident objectives through a series of exercises involving incidents of simple and moderate complexity.

Planning Section Chief S-440 (20 hours)

Primary duties and responsibilities of the planning section chief and subordinate units will be examined.   The extensive information management role of this section will be discussed in terms of collection, potential sources, and subsequent analysis.  Students will understand the key interactions which must occur between the section chief, other members of the command and general staff, off incident organizations, and the host agency for successful incident management.  Preparation of the Incident Action Plan and other section work products will be covered in detail.  Students will develop an incident action plan and other appropriate products of the planning section for an incident of high complexity.

Logistics Section Chief S-450 (16 hours)

Primary duties and responsibilities of the logistics section chief and subordinate units will be examined.  The need for this section to be skilled in various trades and crafts will be discussed as well as the technical services, such as medical and security, provided by this section.  Students will understand the resource mobilization and demobilization processes and be able to apply them in terms of local systems.  Students will understand the key interactions which must occur between the section chief, other members of the command and general staff, off incident organizations, and the host agency for successful incident management.  Students will determine section staffing needs and develop medical and traffic plans for an incident of moderate complexity.  Students must have completed I-300, and preferably I-400 before taking this class.

NOTE:

Instructor manuals, instructor kits, and supplemental teaching materials for any of our training courses are available for purchase. All Hands will provide ‘train-the-trainer’ workshops on any training program upon request. As the designers and producers of emergency management and response programs, All Hands’ goal is to help you identify and accomplish your training needs. There are a wide variety of options available if you are interested in having these programs presented to your state, community or organization. Options range from “we provide instructors” to “teach it yourself.” Give us call, we will be happy to discuss opportunities and options! Detailed “Plans of Instruction” for any of these courses will be sent upon request. Let us know how we can help!